Brady Osborne, an Outside Sales Representative on the Federal Team, spent 11 years in military service prior to joining ADS. Entering the U.S. Coast Guard as a mechanic, he went on to become a Law Enforcement Officer, then a Medic and Operator. From conducting security at high-profile events to deploying overseas in support of the Counter Piracy/Counter Terrorism mission, most of his time in service was spent on the Maritime Security Response Team (MSRT).

We spoke with Brady to learn more about his military background, how that experience helps enable his success at ADS, and his advice for military veterans transitioning into a civilian career.

Brady Osborne

Brady Osborne

Senior Regional Account Manager
Branch of Service: U.S. Coast Guard
Years of Service: 11

Why did you decide to join the military?
I grew up pulling crab traps with my dad in North Florida. I did not even consider college an option at the time. Growing up in a fishing/boating town, I saw the U.S. Coast Guard in action every day. I knew I wanted to get out of my hometown and seek out new adventures, but little did I know I would find myself moving to Alaska at 18 years old. I didn’t even own a winter coat.

What were your roles throughout your time in service?
Initially, I enlisted and went to “A” school as a mechanic but instead of turning wrenches, I was transferred to a law enforcement assignment in Alaska where duties included conducting shipboardings and performing document inspections. This led to the first time, but not the last, that I would shift my career path both in and out of military service. I personally connected with the law enforcement mission, which led me to my next challenge. I attended and passed an assessment selection course to be authorized to transfer to the Maritime Security Response Team (MSRT) out of Chesapeake, VA. After a yearlong process to qualify for the Direct Action Section (DAS), I eventually became the DAS 2 Medic and Troop Leader. Becoming a Medic was another career altering moment for me as I learned a newfound set of skills and self-fulfillment. Most of my 11 years in service was spent on this team conducting security at high profile events and deploying in support of the Counter Piracy/Counter Terrorism mission overseas. I am proud of my time at the MSRT.

What is your current position and how does your military experience fit into your current career?
Currently, I am an Outside Sales Representative on the Federal Team at ADS. I work with all levels of law enforcement and para-military operators in finding and procuring the equipment that increases their performance and keeps them safe. My background in maritime law enforcement has transferred over in my ability to understand the value of the right gear for the right job. Additionally, my time spent on the range afforded me the opportunity to develop ADS’s annual event Federal Range Day from a small show to a large event that hosts over 350 customers and 130 manufacturers. This event brings customers together with industry-proven products and allows operators to get a true understanding of how ADS can help increase their capabilities.

How was your transition from military life to your civilian career?
Leaving the military was one of the hardest yet rewarding things I have ever done. I have two small boys at home and now I get to spend more time helping them through life’s obstacles simply by being present. I have also had to change my mindset in dealing with people and my expectations of their performance. In the military we were given a task and expected to achieve a high level of results the fastest way possible. Now, I have learned that multiple ideas can achieve the same goal in multiple ways. I have learned to lift people up and support them in their learning process in and out of work. The most difficult part of leaving the military that I still struggle with today is that the comradery you develop and the irreplaceable bonds you make.

Brady Osborne in a Helo

Another big obstacle I had to overcome while transitioning to civilian life was realizing that because I may have been good at one thing did not mean I could not be great at something else. I entered the Coast Guard as a mechanic, became a Law Enforcement Officer, then went on to become a Medic and Operator. When I was faced with making the move out of the military, I enrolled in college. I could not believe I could be capable of getting straight A’s in my courses, but I did. I was on the path to become a Physical Therapist when an old teammate convinced me to take an interview at ADS. My wife and I agreed it was something that I should explore. I took a crash course in Interview 101 and within a week, I was a new member of the Federal team. I doubted myself every day for the first year and some days, I still do. But, once again, I accepted the challenge of trying to find success in unfamiliar places.

What tips and/or advice do you have for veterans leaving their time in service and moving into the civilian workforce?
Accept that you will not be told what to do anymore. You will be asked to call on your experience but decide for yourself how successful you want to be. You will have doubts, but you will also find your way if you believe that because you were good in the military, you can be great outside of it.

How does your past military experience empower you in your role here at ADS?
As a troop leader, I had to make quick decisions and be creative at solving problems to accomplish our mission. I use this mindset every day. I do not stop at the first sign of difficulty and embrace navigating through challenging situations. I feel confident in being able to truly understand the needs of my customers and continue to work until I find them the very best solutions for their missions.

Brady Osborne’s 11 years in service provided him a foundation for success on the Federal team at ADS. His experience in Law Enforcement made him a subject matter expert on day 1 – enabling him to provide our customers with the very best logistical solutions and equipment for their missions.

Thank you, Brady, for your dedication to the United States and to the ADS mission.

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More than one third of ADS employees are veterans or members of military families, providing a unique perspective on the work that we do. We are committed to hiring and training ADS team members from within the military community.

Are you interested in transferring your military experience to a career at ADS?